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Workplace communication

Workplace communication

"Nobody succeeds alone."

Your success at work is directly correlated with your ability to communicate effectively with others. It is just as easy give a good message in a bad way as to give a bad message in a good way. One person cannot do everything and if you want to get others to help you, you have to be able to communicate well.

Here are some tried and true tips for great workplace communication.

1. Be aware of your non-verbals.
You can have perfect words but if your tone of voice or your body language are wrong you will ruin the message. If a discussion might get contentious then have it in person, on the phone or by video. There is no tone in text and a perfectly good message can be taken completely the wrong way in email or IM. Make sure you pick the right medium for the message.

2. Listen.
Mastering the skill of active listening will take you a long way in life. Listen with all your body. Repeat back what they have said. Avoid just waiting until you can share your point of view. Active listen avoids mis-understanding and it also makes the other person feel really special.

3. Be open minded.
Go in the conversation with the belief that you might learn something. Know the difference between fact and opinion. You can debate facts but you cannot debate opinions. If you dis-agree with someone, do it agreeable. Remember you are going to have to continue working with the person tomorrow.

4. Adjust your communication style.
Adjust your communication style to the person you are communicating with. If they always email you, then that's how you should start any conversation with them. Likewise, if they always pick up the phone, then that's how you should start any communication with them. Are they a "words" or "picture" person? If they prefer to read then write a long descriptive email. If they prefer to see the message then include lots of images in your communication. Do they prefer short and to the point emails or do they want the whole background story? Whichever it is, tailor your message accordingly.
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